STEPHEN C. GIAMETTA

& Associates, P.C.

Civil Litigation, Elder Law, Immigration,   Collections, Appeals and Criminal Defense

PHONE: 631-743-0LAW (0529)

516.446.0LAW (0529)

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New Your State (Suffolk, Nassau, Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn or New York County).

Criminal Defense

Being charged with a crime is a serious, often scary situation, and one that needs to be properly addressed to assure that it does not become something worse.  Failing to obtain proper representation to address the charges against you can be just as bad as failing to obtain any representation at all.  Regardless of the charges we will mount an aggressive defense in an effort to not only resolve the allegations being made against you with as little damage to your reputation as possible, but to also do so quickly so that you can begin to get back to a normal, unaffected life sooner rather than later.    

  • Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)

  • Illegal Drug Charges (Controlled Substances)

  • Assault, Menacing,  Hazing, Reckless Endangerment, Stalking, Luring

  • Traffic Tickets

Common Criminal Matters

New York State DWI Laws

As you might imagine, the task of deciphering the various laws pertaining to DWI, DWAI or similar violations can be quite daunting.  We feel you should be edcuated as to what you are facing, however, so in keeping with our philosophy of putting the client first we have compiled the following for your benefit.  This guide omits much of the legalease found in those sections of the New York Penal Code pertaining to DWI, DWAI or similar violations, so please understand that it should be considered nothing more than a guide to give you a basic understanding of what you may be facing.*  The specific facts of your particular case will be the most important factor in determining what penalties may lie ahead.  To discuss your case in greater detail, please feel free to contact us at any time of the day or night.

 

Throughout this guide, you will often see the acronyn BAC.  BAC stands for blood alcohol concentration, and is a measurement of the amount of alcohol in your body at the time of the alleged offense.

 

*The information found on this website is not legal advice, and should not be considered as such or be relied upon in any way.

 
 

Driving While Intoxicated

(DWI)

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1192[2] and [3])(1)

 

You can be charged with DWI if your blood alcohol content is:

 

  • 0.08% - if you are 21 years or older.

  • 0.04% - if you drive a commercial vehicle.

  • 0.02% - if you are under age 21.

 

The penalties you are subject to for a DWI offense depend upon a number of factors, such as:

  • Your age.

  • Whether your impairment is solely the result of alcohol, drugs or a combination of the two.

  • The type of license you hold (normal license, commercial license or something similar).

  • Whether you took a chemical test.

 

The following is a break-down of the penalties for a DWI for driver's holding a regular license:

 

21 Years of Age or Older

1st Offense

  • Up to 1 year in jail

  • License revocation for 6 months.

  • Between a $500 and $1,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

2nd Offense (within 10 years of the first violation) – A class E felony

  • Up to 4 years in jail.

  • A minimum of 5 days in jail or 30 days of community service.

  • License revocation for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $1,000 and $5,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

*Remember that for drivers 21 years of age or older his or her blood alcohol content must be .08% or higher to be charged with a DWI.

 

Under 21 years of age

1st Offense

  • Suspended license for 6 months.

  • $125 civil penalty.

  • $100 fee for suspension termination.

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs (see below).

  • Possible ignition interlock device installation, and all associated costs (see below).

 

2nd Offense

  • License revocation for 1 year (or until you turn 21 years old).

  • $125 civil penalty.

  • $100 fee for suspension termination.

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs (see below).

  • Possible ignition interlock device installation, and all associated costs (see below).

 

* Remember that for drivers younger than 21 years of age his or her blood alcohol content must only be .02% or higher to be charged with a DWI.  In such a scenario, the driver is said to have broken New York State’s “Zero Tolerance Law.”

Aggravated Driving While Intoxicated

(A-DWI)

 

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law 1192.2-a

 

You can be charged with ADWI if you are found to be driving with a blood alcohol level of .18% or higher.

 

1st Offense

  • Up to 1 year in jail

  • License revocation for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $1,000 and $2,500 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

2nd Offense (within 10 years) – a class E felony

  • As much as 4 years in jail

  • License revocation for at least 18 months.

  • Between a $1,000 and $5,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

3rd Offense (within 10 years) – a class D felony

  • As much as 7 years in jail

  • License revocation for at least 18 months.

  • Between a $2,000 and $10,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

Driving While Ability Impaired-Alcohol

(DWAI-Alcohol)

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1192[1])(1)

 

A BAC of .05 or more, but less than .08, can lead to a charge of DWAI-Alcohol

 

1st Offense

  • A maximum of 15 days in jail

  • A suspension of your license for 90 days.

  • Between a $300 and $500 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

2nd Offense (within 5 years of either a conviction for ADWI, DWI or DWAI)

  • A maximum of 30 days in jail.

  • A revocation of your license for at least 6 months.

  • Between a $500 and $750 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State’s Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

3rd Offense (within 10 years)

  • A maximum of 90 days in jail.

  • A revocation of your license for 6 months.

  • Between a $750 and $1,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State’s Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

Driving While Ability Impaired-Drugs

(DWAI-Drugs)

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1192.4

 

There are several factors that law enforcement can use to make a determination as to whether a driver is under the influence of drugs.  These include, but are not limited to, the driver's eyes (are they dilated?), how the driver acts, whether there is a smell of drugs in the vehicle or on the driver (such as with marijuana), whether drugs are present in the vehicle or on the driver and, quite simply, whether the driver admits to being under the influence of drugs while driving.  The penalties for such a violation are listed below.

 

1st Offense

  • A maximum of 1 year in jail

  • A suspension of your license for 6 months.

  • Between a $500 and $1,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

2nd Offense (within 10 years) – Class E Felony

  • A maximum of 4 years in jail

  • A revocation of your license for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $1,000 and $5,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of the state's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • A minimum of 5 days in jail or 30 days of community service.

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

3rd Offense (within 10 years) – Class D Felony

  • A maximum of 7 years in jail

  • A revocation of your license for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $2,000 and $10,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of the state's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • A minimum of 5 days in jail or 30 days of community service.

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

Driving While Ability Impaired-Drugs & Alcohol

(DWAI-Combination)

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1192.4(a)

 

A charge of driving while ability impaired will be imposed if a driver is under the influence of both alcohol and drugs.  There are several factors that law enforcement can use to make a determination as to whether a driver is under the influence of drugs.  These include, but are not limited to, the driver's eyes (are they dilated?), how the driver acts, whether there is a smell of drugs in the vehicle or on the driver (such as with marijuana), whether drugs are present in the vehicle or on the driver and, quite simply, wehther the driver actually admits to being under the influence of drugs while driving.  The penalties for such a violation are listed below.

 

1st Offense

  • A maximum of 1 year in jail.

  • A revocation of your license for at least 6 months.

  • Between a $500 and $1,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

2nd Offense (within 10 years) – Class E Felony

  • A maximum of 4 years in jail.

  • A revocation of your license for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $1,000 and $5,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

 

3rd Offense (within 10 years) – Class D Felony

  • A maximum of 7 years in jail.

  • A revocation of your license for at least 1 year.

  • Between a $2,000 and $10,000 fine.

  • A minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years (this is part of New York State's Driver Responsibility Program).

  • Possible enrollment in the New York Drinking Driver Program (DDP) and all the associated costs.

Chemical Test Refusal (CTR) &

Miscellaneous Items

 

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1194(1)(b)

 

Pursuant to New York's Implied Consent Law, you give your consent to have blood, breath, urine, or saliva tested for alcohol or drugs if you are stopped by a police officer.  As such, refusal to consent to such a request is in itself a violation that can result in the following penalties:

 

21 Years of Age or Older

1st Offense

  • License revocation for at least 1 year (18 months for commercial drivers).

  • $500 civil penalty ($550 civil penalty for commercial drivers). You must pay this before you can reapply for your license.

 

2nd Offense (within 5 years of a prior refusal or another DWI-related charge)

  • $750 civil penalty.

  • License revocation for at least 18 months (permanent CDL revocation).

 

Under 21 Years of Age

If you are younger than 21 years old and you violate the Zero tolerance law by refusing a chemical test, you face the following consequences:

 

1st Offense

  • $300 civil penalty.

  • $100 to reapply for your license.

  • License revocation for at least 1 year.

 

2nd Offense

  • $750 civil penalty.

  • $100 fee to reapply for your license.

  • License revocation for at least 1 year.

NOTE: These penalties also apply to subsequent offenses.

 

*In addition to the above, anyone convicted of refusing a chemical test must also pay a minimum $250 annual assessment fine, for a total of $750 in fines over 3 years as part of the state’s Driver Responsibility Program.

 

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law §1192.2-a(b) - Leandra's Law

 

  • A person who operates a vehicle while under the influence with a passenger under the age of sixteen is guilty of a class E felony

    • This is punishable by $5,000.00 fine and/or up to four years in prison.

  • A person who causes the death of a person under the age of sixteen can be charged with aggravated vehicular homicide

    • This means that instead of a class B felony the charge is upgraded to a class B violent felony, and the punishments that pertain to such a felony will apply.

  • A person who causes serious physical injury to a person under the age of sixteen can be charged with aggravated vehicular assault

    • This means that instead of a class C felony the charge is upgraded to a class C violent felony, and the punishments that pertain to such a felony will apply.

 

 

 

 

New York's laws related to illegal drugs are lengthy, varied and extremely fact specific.  As such, a nuanced difference between two seemingly similar situations can often mean the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony, jail time or simple a fine/probation.  We therefore urge you to contact us to discuss your particular situation. Moreover, rather than list herein the entirety of the New York State Penal Code relating to drug possession we have instead opted to include the following link that will take you to directly to the section of the Code relating to same, which is Article 220.  We have also included the type of penalty that is generally possible under these sections of the Penal Code.  There are a multitude of factors that influence sentencing, however, so for a more detailed view of the penalties associated with a particular Class of crime please contact us today to discuss your particular situation.

Section 220.03

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree

Class A Misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year, plus a $1,000 fine or twice the amount gained by perpetrating the crime)

Section 220.06

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 220.09

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth degree

Class C Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-2 years to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 220.16

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree

Class B Felony (minimum of 1-3 years to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 220.18

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree

Class A-II Felony (minimum of 3 years to a maximum of 10)

Section 220.21

Criminal possession of a controlled substance in the first degree

Class A-I Felony (minimum of 8 years to a maximum of 20)

Section 220.28

Use of a child to commit a controlled substance offense

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.31

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

 

Section 220.34

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree

Class C Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-2 years to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 220.39

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree

Class B Felony (minimum of 1-3 years to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 220.41

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the second degree

Class A-II Felony (minimum of 3 years to a maximum of 10)

Section 220.43

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in the first degree

Class A-I Felony (minimum of 8 years to a maximum of 20)

Section 220.44

Criminal sale of a controlled substance in or near school grounds

Class B Felony (minimum of 1-3 years to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 220.45

Criminally possessing a hypodermic instrument

Class A Misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 220.46

Criminal injection of a narcotic drug

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.48

Criminal sale of a controlled substance to a child

Class B Felony (minimum of 1-3 years to a maximum of 25 years)

 

Section 220.50

Criminally using drug paraphernalia in the second degree

Class A Misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 220.55

Criminally using drug paraphernalia in the first degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 220.60

Criminal possession of precursors of controlled substances

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.65

Criminal sale of a prescription for a controlled substance or of a controlled substance by a practitioner or pharmacist

Class C Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-2 years to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 220.70

Criminal possession of methamphetamine manufacturing material in the second degree

Class A Misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 220.71

Criminal possession of methamphetamine manufacturing material in the first degree

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.72

Criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.73

Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the third degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

 

Section 220.74

Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the second degree

Class C Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-2 years to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 220.75

Unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the first degree

Class B Felony (minimum of 1-3 years to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 220.76

Unlawful disposal of methamphetamine laboratory material

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 220.77

Operating as a major trafficker

Class A-I Felony (minimum of 8 years to a maximum of 20)

Section 220.78

Witness or victim of drug or alcohol overdose

Class A-I Felony (minimum of 8 years to a maximum of 20) or A-II Felony (minimum of 3 years to a maximum of 10)

In addition to setting forth the various charges relating to drug possession, Article 200 of the Penal Code also provides for a presumption of possession under certain circumstances.  Specifically, Section 220.25, entitled Criminal possession of a controlled substance; presumption, states the following:

               1. The presence of a controlled substance in an automobile, other than a  public omnibus, is presumptive evidence of knowing possession thereof by each and every person in the automobile at the time  such  controlled substance  was found; except that such presumption does not apply (a) to a duly licensed operator of an automobile who is at the  time  operating it for hire in the lawful and proper pursuit of his trade, or (b) to any person  in the automobile if one of them, having obtained the controlled substance and not being under duress, is authorized to  possess  it  and such  controlled  substance is in the same container as when he received possession thereof, or (c) when the controlled  substance  is  concealed upon the person of one of the occupants.

               2. The presence of a narcotic drug, narcotic preparation, marihuana or phencyclidine  in  open view in a room, other than a public place, under circumstances evincing an intent to unlawfully mix, compound, package or otherwise prepare for sale  such  controlled  substance  is  presumptive evidence of knowing possession thereof by each and every person in close proximity  to  such  controlled  substance  at  the time such controlled substance was found; except that such presumption does not apply to  any such  persons  if  (a)  one  of  them,  having  obtained such controlled substance and not being under duress, is authorized to  possess  it  and such  controlled  substance is in the same container as when he received possession thereof, or (b) one of them  has  such  controlled  substance upon his person.

 

 

To begin, it should be noted that in the context of a criminal action there is no such thing as Assault and Battery in the State of New York.  There are, however, varied types of just Assault.  Those crimes, as well as the class and penalty associated with each, have been listed below.  Also listed are the somewhat related crimes of menacing, hazing, reckless endangerment, stalking and luring.  To see the entirety of the legal language for each of these crimes please click on the following link to the Article of the New York State Penal Code relating to same, which is Article 120.  There are a multitude of factors that will determine the type of crime with which you may be found guilty, as well as the type of penalty/sentence that may be imposed.  We therefore invite you to contact us to discuss your case in greater detail.

Section 120.00

Assault in the third degree

Class A misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 120.01

Reckless assault of a child by a child day care provider

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

 

Section 120.02

Reckless assault of a child

Class D Violent Felony (minimum of 2 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 120.03

Vehicular assault in the second degree

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 120.04

Vehicular assault in the first degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 120.04-a

Aggravated vehicular assault

Class C Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-2 years to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 120.05

Assault in the second degree

Class D Violent Felony (minimum of 2 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 120.06

Gang assault in the second degree

Class C Felony (minimum of 3&1/2 to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 120.07

Gang assault in the first degree

Class B Felony (minimum of 5 to a maximum of 25 years)

 

Section 120.08

Assault on a peace officer, police officer, fireman or emergency medical services professional

Class C Felony (minimum of 3&1/2 to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 120.09

Assault on a judge

Class C Felony (minimum of 3&1/2 to a maximum of 15 years)

Section 120.10

Assault in the first degree

Class B Felony (minimum of 5 to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 120.11

Aggravated assault upon a police officer or a peace officer

Class B Felony (minimum of 5 to a maximum of 25 years)

Section 120.12

Aggravated assault upon a person less than eleven years old

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 120.13

Menacing in the first degree

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 120.14

Menacing in the second degree

Class A misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

 

Section 120.15

Menacing in the third degree

Class B Misdemeanor (up to 3 months)

Section 120.16

Hazing in the first degree

Class A misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 120.17

Hazing in the second degree

Violation (up to 15 days in jail)

Section 120.18

Menacing a police officer or peace officer

Class D Violent Felony (minimum of 2 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 120.20

Reckless endangerment in the second degree

Class A misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 120.25

Reckless endangerment in the first degree

Class D Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1-3 to a maximum of 7 years)

 

Section 120.30

Promoting a suicide attempt

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 120.45

Stalking in the fourth degree

Class B Misdemeanor (up to 3 months)

Section 120.50

Stalking in the third degree

Class A misdemeanor (anything from 15 days to less than one year)

Section 120.55

Stalking in the second degree

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years)

Section 120.60

Stalking in the first degree

Class D Violent Felony (minimum of 2 to a maximum of 7 years)

Section 120.70  

Luring a child

Class E Felony (no jail, probation, minimum of 1&1/3 to a maximum of 4 years), but if the underlying offense the actor intended to commit against such child constituted a class A or a class B felony, then the offense of luring a child in violation of this section is a Class C or D Felony, respectively.

 

With respect to traffic tickets our goal is to reduce the amount of points assessed against your license or the fine incurred.  This is not always an easy task, especially if you have other violations on your record.  So please contact us to discuss your particular situation to see if we may be able to assist you obtain the best possible outcome.  Below is some helpful information to educate you on what you might be facing if you recently received a traffic ticket.

The various fines associated with traffic tickets typically depend upon the county in which the ticket was issued and what violations have been incurred in the past.  Points, however, are the same throughout the state.  Points are typically more damaging too, as they can lead to increased insurance premiums, additional fees and the possible suspension of your license.  When 6 points have been accumulated in an 18 month period the driver in question might be made to pay a driver responsibility assessment fee as well as other fines and penalties, all of which is paid over a 3 year period.

In New York, a driver's license may be suspended if 11 points are received within an 18 month period.  A suspension begins from the date of the violation.  18 months after that date those points will no longer count towards the total points on a license. 

The most common types of infractions and the points associated with same are...

  • Failure to recognize a stop sign or traffic signal

  • Failure to obey child safety restraint regulations.

  • Fleeing the scene of an accident when resulting in property damage or the injury of an animal

For any of the above violations a total of 3 points will be assessed.

  • Failure to keep a safe following distance

  • Speeding 11 to 20 MPH over the designated limit

For any of the above violations a total of 4 points will be assessed.

  • Texting while driving

  • Reckless operation of a vehicle

  • Passing a school bus when stopped

For any of the above violations a total of 5 points will be assessed.

  • Speeding 21 to 30 MPH over the speed limit

For the above violations a total of 6 points will be assessed.

  • Speeding 31 to 40 MPH over limit

For the above violations a total of 8 points will be assessed.

  • Speeding more than 40 MPH over limit

For the above violations a total of 11 points will be assessed.

Illegal Drug Charges

(New York Penal Law Article 220)

Assault & Related Charges

(New York Penal Law Article 120)

Traffic Tickets

 
 
 

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Office locations: West Babylon, Smithtown

Mailing address: ​​1001 Hawkins Ave, #1294  -  Lake Grove, New York 11755